Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Disney Channel's Long Lost Halloween Special

© Slate

Disney is famous for its fairy tale adaptations, but did you know that one especially spooky made-for-television adaptation aired only once on Halloween and was never seen again?


It's Halloween, and television networks are airing their scariest horror movies and Halloween specials.

Many networks attempt to create their specials with the intention of them becoming the big Halloween equivalent to Rudolph or Frosty.

This has worked for some specials like Disney Channel's Halloweentown; but other specials fail to meet such high expectations, and end up broadcasting once and only once, never to be aired again.

This often leads viewers lucky enough to catch the special during its one and only airing to speculate why it was never re-aired, often to the point where their speculation turns to urban legend.

I’m sure most of you have heard about Cry Baby Lane, the made-for-television Nickelodeon movie which aired on Halloween in 2000 but was never aired again, causing it to be the subject of creepypasta speculating that it was simply “too scary.” (Turns out the movie was simply forgotten!)

What if I told you that something similar occurred with the Disney Channel? That there was a made-for-television movie that aired on Halloween once and only once, never to be aired again?

For more than 30 years, this movie was considered to be a lost film, or even simply an urban legend. But not only was this movie real, it was created by one of the greatest directors of everything mysterious and spooky. Would you believe such a movie was real?

To learn more about this long lost Halloween special, click READ MORE:

Monday, October 30, 2017

Disney Dudebro Updates (10/30/2017)


Well, my new blog has been up for at least a good month, and it’s experienced some adequate success. Really looking for some more success next month.

The bad news is that both Tangled: The Series and Ducktales are going on hiatus, so no new episode recaps for them.

The good news is that next month will see the premiere of the new Disney XD series, Big Hero 6: The Series. So expect episode recaps of that.

Also, new episodes of Star Vs. The Forces of Evil will start airing on Nov. 6, so also expect episode recaps of that.

As for previous SVTFOE episodes, since there are far too many, I won’t be creating any recaps of them.

Instead, I’ll be creating two Top 10 lists of the best episodes of seasons one and two. (They’re all based on my opinion, so bear that in mind.)

Aside from all that, expect to see more of the same Throwback Thursdays, Fan Art Fridays, and Dateline Disneys, as well as more think pieces and blog posts of all things Disney related.

So if you haven’t followed my blog yet, feel free to do so, and also follow me on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and Buzzfeed.

And if you have been following my new blog, please let me know what you’ve enjoyed most and what more you’d like to see.

Sunday, October 29, 2017

PREVIEW: Disney Channel's Long Lost Halloween Special

© Slate

Disney is famous for its fairy tale adaptations, but did you know that one especially spooky made-for-television adaptation aired only once on Halloween and was never seen again?


It's Halloween, and television networks are airing their scariest horror movies and Halloween specials.

Many networks attempt to create their specials with the intention of them becoming the big Halloween equivalent to Rudolph or Frosty.

This has worked for some specials like Disney Channel's Halloweentown; but other specials fail to meet such high expectations, and end up broadcasting once and only once, never to be aired again.

This often leads viewers lucky enough to catch the special during its one and only airing to speculate why it was never re-aired, often to the point where their speculation turns to urban legend.

I’m sure most of you have heard about Cry Baby Lane, the made-for-television Nickelodeon movie which aired on Halloween in 2000 but was never aired again, causing it to be the subject of creepypasta speculating that it was simply “too scary.” (Turns out the movie was simply forgotten!)

What if I told you that something similar occurred with the Disney Channel? That there was a made-for-television movie that aired on Halloween once and only once, never to be aired again?

For more than 30 years, this movie was considered to be a lost film, or even simply an urban legend. But not only was this movie real, it was created by one of the greatest directors of everything mysterious and spooky. Would you believe such a movie was real?

To learn more about this long lost Halloween special, read the rest of this post on Buzzfeed or Medium. The full post will be published on this blog on Halloween:

Dateline Disney (10/29/2017)


Robert Guillaume, the voice of Rafiki in The Lion King, recently passed away. Though he may not be joining the great kings in the night sky, he will continue to live on in the Great Circle of Life!

In other news, Disneyland plans on setting up a new hotel, Disney World plans on setting up new additions to Toy Story Land, and Disney Channel will be setting up two characters in its first ever same-sex pairing. All of this news and more in this week's Dateline Disney:

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Ducktales Recap: The Living Mummies of Toth-Ra!


Nine episodes in and we finally have an authentic Ducktales adventure outside of Duckburg! And it involves fighting the mummy from the opening theme song? Ducktales, you spoil me!

I can't say that I grew up on Ducktales. I didn't start watching it until late elementary school. I was more into Darkwing Duck and Talespin. However, I was introduced to the series through the movie, Treasure of the Lost Lamp, which was the very first Disney movie I ever watched in theaters at the ripe age of three. So this episode really gives me warm memories of that movie.

Also, you really have to appreciate its moral about avoiding blind faith. Sure, you may never find yourself working as a serf within an underground cavern for a mummy's cult, but sadly, there are plenty of politicians who will demand your blind obedience, whether they're promising to give you a wall and bring back your coal job, or promising to give you free stuff at the expense of other people.

Of course, now that you mention it, wouldn't life be much easier if we could rise up against clearly tyrannical leaders like the characters did in this episode? It would certainly spare us another three to seven years!

For a scene-by-scene recap, click READ MORE:

Friday, October 27, 2017

Fan Art Friday: It's Good To Be Bad


Halloween is right around the corner, which means that it's that time of year again to revel in everything dark and evil. For Disney, it's the time to exonerate the very people who allow the good guys to shine their brightest when contrasted with the darkness of their own hearts: the Disney villains. So for this Fan Art Friday, we'll be showcasing fan art featuring the baddest of the bad:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Throwback Thursday: DTV Monster Hits

© YouTube
Halloween is right around the corner, which means it's almost time for Halloween parties. And what Halloween party is complete without Halloween music?

What's your favorite Halloween tune? Monster Mash? Thriller? The Ghostbusters Theme? What if I told you that you could enjoy all of these songs and more combined with Disney animation to make the most spooktacular music videos?

You can with this obscure television special from the 1980s showcasing music videos of the best Halloween songs set alongside classic Disney animation.

To learn more about this television special, click READ MORE:

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Is Jessica Rabbit Asexual?

© Tumblr

Who Framed Roger Rabbit’s Jessica Rabbit may be considered a sexual icon, but could she actually be an asexual icon?


This week, from October 22 to October 28, is Asexual Awareness Week, which, true to its name, helps promote awareness about asexuality, as well as demi-sexuality and aromantic relationships.

While I myself am not an asexual—I’m simply not getting any!—many of my favorite internet personalities, and even a close real life friend of mine, identify as asexual.

As such, I wanted to do my part in spreading asexual awareness by writing an article on the topic. And what better topic than one speculating which Disney characters are asexual?

While Disney doesn’t have any official asexual characters, that hasn’t stopped fans within the asexual community from speculating about the potential asexuality of many characters like Belle and Elsa.

But perhaps the most interesting speculation has to be about a character whom would be the least likely to be considered an asexual: Jessica Rabbit.

To learn more about Jessica's alleged asexuality, click READ MORE:

Monday, October 23, 2017

Tangled Recap: Way of the Willow


Well, this is an episode I'd never imagine would be made. Rapunzel teams up with Mr. Toad and go on an epic motorcar chase to nowhere in particular.

Oh, wait! This episode is called "Way of the Willow", not "Wind in the Willows." So what's this episode about?

Stop me if you've heard this one before: someone receives a mysterious pet as a gift, and they're given one simple instruction to not do one thing. They do that one thing anyway, and the mysterious pets starts multiplying like crazy and creating chaos.

Yeah, if you're seen Gremlins or Star Trek's "The Trouble With Tribbles", you've seen one half of this episode. What's the other half? You're cliché sibling rivalry storyline that every sitcom and their mother has already done.

To be fair, Willow is a very interesting character, and we do get to see more of Queen Arianna's character, and one serves as the ideal foil for the other. But other than that, there's not really much new this episode has to offer.

For a scene-by-scene recap, click READ MORE:

Sunday, October 22, 2017

PREVIEW: Is Jessica Rabbit Asexual?

© Tumblr

Who Framed Roger Rabbit’s Jessica Rabbit may be considered a sexual icon, but could she actually be an asexual icon?


This week, from October 22 to October 28, is Asexual Awareness Week, which, true to its name, helps promote awareness about asexuality, as well as demi-sexuality and aromantic relationships.

While I myself am not an asexual—I’m simply not getting any!—many of my favorite internet personalities, and even a close real life friend of mine, identify as asexual.

As such, I wanted to do my part in spreading asexual awareness by writing an article on the topic. And what better topic than one speculating which Disney characters are asexual?

While Disney doesn’t have any official asexual characters, that hasn’t stopped fans within the asexual community from speculating about the potential asexuality of many characters like Belle and Elsa.

But perhaps the most interesting speculation has to be about a character whom would be the least likely to be considered an asexual: Jessica Rabbit.

To learn more about Jessica's alleged asexuality, read the rest of this post on Buzzfeed or Medium. The full post will be published on this blog on Wednesday:

Dateline Disney (10/22/2017)


Disney World workers rally for higher wages, and the Avengers rally for support for Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, athletes will no longer be rallying in Disneyland for any marathons until construction is clear. All of this new and more in this week's Dateline Disney. Feel free to read this week's headlines by clicking READ MORE:

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Ducktales Recap: The Infernal Internship of Mark Beaks


Ducktales may be a timeless show that can be easily adapted to any time (as this series so far proves), but there are some aspects that haven't aged well. For example, Scrooge McDuck obtained his wealth through his lifelong career as an industrialist, thus making him a caricature of the Robber Barons. Considering how manufacturing jobs have been on the decline in recent years, such a career path no longer seems feasible in this day and age, making Scrooge literally a relic of another time. Nowadays, the big money is being made, not through the manufacturing sector, but within the tech sector. So it only made sense for the series to bring in a new character to reflect these new times.

Enter Mark Beaks, the tech mogul who represents the new breed of entrepreneurs making their money in the tech sector. As such, he perfectly encapsulates all of the vices that have come to stereotype the Silicon Valley "tech bro." And that right there is the major problem with his character. Most of his tech-savvy nature is centered around such stereotypes, which makes all of the comedy surrounding him focused solely on regurgitating jokes about social media. If you've heard one joke about how Silicon Valley types are eccentric "out-of-touch" kooks, or how young people these days are obsessed with smart phones and social media, you've pretty much heard all of the jokes being made about Mark.

Where this episode shines, however, is two fold. First is the rivalry between Scrooge and Glumgold, a rivalry so petty that some of their biggest conflicts involve something as simple as a staring contest, though major enough that they often involve Glumgold trying to make an attempt against Scrooge's life. Of course, so incompetent is Glumgold in these attempts that Scrooge barely considers him a threat, to the point where he can comfortably maintain their relationship more along the lines of "frenemies" rather than as "mortal enemies."

The other good aspect is with the storyline involving Huey and Dewey. Both have been accepted as interns at Mark's company with aspirations of eventually climbing the corporate ladder and becoming tech moguls themselves. While Huey is dead set on achieving such a goal, whereas his slacker brother couldn't care less, he learns the hard way a lesson I'm sure most of us have also learned in our occupations: that the myth of meritocracy is just that--a myth! This is especially true when it comes to the tech sector, which, far from being a "free market", is very much a "crony capitalist system" where hard work can always be upstaged by some guy with higher connections and a better personality, and where someone can make it big by literally doing nothing. Considering who's sitting in the White House office right now, it's a lesson that really and sadly remains relevant.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Is Kamala Khan’s Ms. Marvel Coming To The MCU?

© Nerd Reactor


Marvel fans will marvel over the upcoming Captain Marvel movie, but will Marvel marvel them within another Ms. Marvel?


Spider-Man: Homecoming came home on DVD/Blu-Ray earlier this week, with Thor set to bring the thunder into theaters next month with Thor: Ragnarok. Of course, the big movie that Marvel fans have been waiting for infinity over is next summer’s Avenger: Infinity War!

Perhaps even more anticipated than next summer’s guaranteed blockbuster hit are the two movies starring the MCU’s first African-American and female superhero leads, with 2018’s Black Panther and 2019’s Captain Marvel respectively.

The latter movie is especially anticipated by Marvel fangirls and fanboys alike, as it will not only introduce the first female superhero lead, but it could also potentially lead to the introduction of another female superhero: Ms. Marvel.

To learn more about how this marvelous super heroine could be coming to the MCU, click READ MORE:


S.S. Disney: Disney's Floating Traveling Theme Park That Never Was

© Flickr

Disney has several theme parks around the world, and even a fleet of cruise ships that sail the Seven Seas. But did you know that Disney wanted to combine those two things together and create a floating, traveling theme park?


Imagine being able to enjoy the magic of Disneyland anywhere in the world, getting to ride classic attractions like It’s A Small World and Space Mountain, and all you had to do was step onto a ship larger than an aircraft carrier that would travel to one of many port of calls worldwide.

Sounds like a idea out of a child’s wild imagination? Believe it or not, it was actually close to becoming reality, and the story behind it started back in the 1990s.

To learn more about Disney's never-made floating, traveling theme park, click READ MORE:

Ducktales Recap: House Of The Lucky Gander


(Originally posted on October 15, 2017.)


You know, for the past 70 years, Donald Duck has always been stuck with all the bad luck, and now we know why: his cousin, Gladstone Gander, was born with all the good luck!

This episode was quite the breath of fresh air. Not only do we finally have an episode set outside of Duckburg, but also one starring Scrooge and Donald. Of course, that’s not to say there’s anything wrong with an episode that focuses on the children or that further explores the city of Duckburg, but since this is a series about the grand adventures of the richest duck in the world, it would be nice to have an episode where the richest duck in the world actually goes on a grand adventure.

And what a grander setting for such a grand adventure than the Lucky Fortune Casino in the Asian-inspired city of Macaw? The bright colors and exotic décor make this location quite pleasant to look at, making it all the more sinister in its allure, and hiding the fact that it’s all a clear trap. Then again, if the shifty casino owner didn’t give away that fact, then the fault is all on your own naivety.

But perhaps the best part of this episode was the meta narrative surrounding Donald. As I said, for as long as he’s been around for the past 70 years, he’s been met with nothing but bad luck, and yet the fact that he manages to keep moving forward despite that bad luck is a testament to his own fortitude. As Louie said, “If common sense hasn’t stopped you before, why should it now?”

Also, it would be really neat if there was another episode that showed Launchpad’s unseen side story with him saving an old girlfriend from a local crime family. Seriously, how come we couldn’t see that?

For a scene-by-scene recap, click READ MORE:

Ducktales Recap: Terror of the Terra-firmians


(Originally posted on October 8, 2017.)


While this week's episode is split into three different storylines, each of them are united by the central theme of faith.

For Huey and Webby, that theme exemplifies itself in the conflict between faith and science. Huey wants to rely only on the science within his handbook, while Webby exerts her faith in things she doesn't fully understand. While other stories of similar conflict would ask the scientifically-minded character to give up science and embrace blind faith, this episode offers a better message of using science to investigate the unknown in order to uncover the mysteries behind faith.

For Lena and Mrs. Beakley, this theme focuses on the faith that Mrs. Beakley has for Lena, or rather, the lack therof. Mrs. Beakley starts out by assuming Lena to be a "bad example" for her grand-daughter and the other children, but after Lena proves herself by saving her, Mrs. Beakley learns to eventually have faith in Lena--though as this episode proves, such "faith" might not be good.

And finally, with Dewey and Launchpad--eh, well, this is certainly one of the weaker of the three storylines. However, while not the most interesting of the three, this storyline, in its own way, does a good job of teaching to have faith in oneself. Because after all, if anyone can be a mole monster, including yourself, and if you are a good person, than that means other people can be good and worth trusting. It's the closest a kid's cartoon comes to explaining the concept of, "I think, therefore, I am!"

Either way, as an exciting episode that offers a lot in world and character building, this is certainly one of the better episodes thus far.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Ducktales Recap: Beagle Boy Birthday Massacre


(Originally posted on October 9, 2017.)


My expectations were quite low when I learned that not only was this episode introducing a new character, but would also be yet another Beagle Boy episode--only one episode after introducing them. Those expectations were quickly risen not only by an excellent Warriors parody, but also through a hint of yet another iconic villain making her way real soon.

This episode introduces a new character to the series, Lena. While it would be easy to hate on her for being a new character (a la Scrappy Doo Derangement Syndrome), not only should we remember that many iconic Ducktales characters were not only new characters that had never appeared in the original comics (i.e.: Gizmo Duck), but we should also realize that Lena does provide a good character dynamic for this new show, and not only because she's been revealed to be related to an iconic villain.

In this series, Webby's a character who has grown up living a shelter experience for most of her life, being shut away from the rest of the world with little to no opportunity to make friends. She of course befriends the nephews, but this relationship does seem rather obligatory, what with them being the relatives of the man for whom her grandmother works for (and also from the meta perspective of her being one of the main characters).

So in this episode, we finally get to see her develop a relationship with a new friend that she met on her own, proving that she is capable of socializing on her own, despite her reclusive nature, and thus helping her break free of her sheltered past. This new friendship also proves to serve as a wedge between her and the nephews, as it gets her to doubt their own reliability as friends (after all, what real friends would leave someone behind?), and thus help to set up conflict that will lead to an potentially inevitable rift later in the season (and considering Lena's allegiance with her Aunt, it could prove to be quite the conflict.)

Of course, aside from providing character development for Webby's new character, this episode did manage to provide an overall good time with all of the different variations of the Beagle Boys.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:


Ducktales Recap: The Great Dime Chase


One of the things that I most appreciate about Ducktales, both the original and this reboot, is how it extols the virtues of capitalism, especially during an especially cynical time when such virtues are often doubted—mostly by the economically illiterate.

Scrooge McDuck is no doubt one of the richest characters in the fictional world, as the very size of his money bin proves, but unlike most other affluent members of the 1%, his wealth was not inherited, but rather earned through his own hard work. (Side note: the vast majority of American millionaires are self-made, with those born into wealth being the exception rather than the rule, contrary to what certain political movements would have you believe.)

Add the fact that Scrooge is also an immigrant who arrived to America seeking a better life, and he proves himself to be an exemplar of the American Dream, not only because of this country being one of opportunity where anyone can make it through hard work and determination, but also because this country was one created through immigration as a “Great American Melting Pot!” As such, he easily serves as a refutation to both the blind ideology of the Occupy Movement and the blind prejudices of Trump and the alt right.

It is precisely because Scrooge appreciates the value of hard work that he not only intends to instill such values into his own family (as was the case with Louie in this episode), but that he has saved the very first dime that he earned to serve as a testament to such values, and thus provides enough value in its existence to provide necessary conflict in this episode when it inevitably goes missing.

Other than that, this was an otherwise great episode, with the subplot doing a decent enough job to further the series long story arc concerning the Nephew’s mother, and the introduction of Gyro Gearloose, while not being perfect, doing a good enough job to serve as a catalyst for future episodes, especially when setting up the inevitable appearance of Gizmo Duck.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:


Ducktales Recap: Day Trip of Doom


(Originally posted on October 6, 2017.)


One of the major changes for the reboot has been with the character Webby Vanderquack. While the original Webby was the stereotypical token “girly girl” created to be the female counterpart to the three nephews, this Webby is anything but typical, being evidently much more empowered than her original character.

But while the new Webby has been warmly embraced by the fan base as an overall improvement, there’s no doubt that this type of character is capable of still receiving backlash from certain fans—the type of fans who would consider her to be “too good” for her own good, and almost “too good” to be a “realistic” character. You know, the kind of “fans” who are quick to deride any strong female character as a “Mary Sue.” The kind of fans who hate the new Star Wars because of Rey? You know? Those fans!

While I don’t believe this particular episode was intentionally created by the show’s staff as a rebuttal to such a backlash, it does certainly do a good job addressing any “skeptic” who would have the audacity to complain that Webby's “too good” to be “realistic.” This is especially true with her dialogue near the end with her and the nephews trapped by the Beagle Boys, wherein she tries to hide her “power level” believing that she wouldn’t be liked otherwise.

Also have to love the subplot involving Donald and Mrs. Beakly. It does a good job of showing what happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object. (I’ll let you guess which character is which metaphor.)

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:


Ducktales Recap: Woo-oo! (Part 2)


(Originally posted on October 5, 2017.)


Here's the episode recap for the second part of the two part Ducktales series premiere. Click here for part one.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Ducktales Recap: Woo-oo! (Part 1)


When the Ducktales reboot was announced two years ago, many fans of the Disney Afternoon classic (myself included) were skeptical about the announcement. Most other reboots, from Teen Titans Go! to Powerpuff Girls 2016, haven't exactly been providing fans with the confidence that old cartoons can be remade for a modern audience without sacrificing what made the original cartoons great.

Ducktales proved to be a bird of a different feather, as it was placed in the hands of  talented creators who had more than enough respect for the original series to make a faithful adaptation. As such, when the new series premiered through a two-part special in July, it proved that the reboot wasn't only as good as the original, but had the potential to be better.

There's not much I can say about the new series that hasn't already been praised by other critics: the art design and animation that pays homage to the original Carl Banks comic books, the re-imagining of Webby Vanderquack and Mrs. Beakly as more empowered female characters, the inclusion of Donald Duck who was absent from the original series despite being featured prominently in the comics, and finally, the long-awaited details about the whereabouts of the nephews' parents (or at least their mother).

The pilot itself serves as a prime example of a reboot done right, and ought to serve as a lesson to creators and animators alike, both present and future, about what to do when making a proper reboot.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Fan Art Friday: Your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man


(Originally posted on October 20, 2017.)


Spider-Man Homecoming was recently released on DVD. Having watched the movie when it was first released in theaters, I can safely say that, while this adaptation of the web-slinger isn't as great as good as the original Sam Raimi films, it was far better than the Amazing Spider-Man films, and an overall great way to integrate Spidey into the MCU. If you haven't seen it, by all means catch it on DVD, if for no other reason than to prepare yourself for Avengers: Infinity War next year. Until then, check out this cool fan art:

Fan Art Friday: Friendship Is (Disney) Magic!


(Originally posted by October 6, 2017.)


To celebrate the opening of My Little Pony: The Movie, here's some Disney fan art in the style of My Little Pony:

Fan Art Friday: Life Is Like A Hurricane


(Originally posted on October 13, 2017.)


The Ducktales reboot started airing earlier last month following its premiere in July. While many reboots of other classic properties such as The Powerpuff Girls and Teen Titans have proven to be abysmal failures, this reboot not only has proven faithful to the original Ducktales series, but also has the potential of possibly surpassing it. Only time will tell. Until then, here's some awesome fan art:

Throwback Thursday: Original Spider-Man—Uncensored!

© Wikipedia

(Originally posted on October 19, 2017.)


Spider-Man: Homecoming is being released on DVD/Blu-Ray this week. So what better way to celebrate his latest big screen appearance than with his earliest appearance on the small screen?

First aired on 1967, the original Spider-Man animated series was the first ever appearance of the famous web-slinger on any screen, be it big or small.

However, as the animated series aired during the 1960s, it had many scenes (and even full episodes) that would be considered too “politically incorrect” for television today—especially for children.

Learn what was so "controversial" about the old Spider-Man after the break:

Throwback Thursday: Walt Disney And You

© Disney Wiki

(Originally posted on October 12, 2017.)


The Walt Disney Company began distributing its own movies on home video in 1980. Chances are if you grew up in the early 1980s and popped in a Disney VHS tape, you were greeted with the following musical number:



To learn more about this most nostalgic and iconic promo of the early 1980s, click READ MORE:

Throwback Thursday: The Magic of Walt Disney World

© Disney Wiki

(Originally posted on October 5, 2017.)


This week marks the anniversary of Walt Disney World, which first opened on October 1, 1971. Hard to believe that people have been visiting the "Happiest Place on Earth" for almost 50 years.

Nowadays, when people want to learn more about the park and plan their vacation, they visit the Walt Disney World website. However, long before the internet, if you wanted to learn about the park, you had to visit a travel agent's office to obtain a vacation booklet or video cassette.

And long before the invention of the VCR, if people wanted a more in-depth look at the park, they could always watch a travelogue, which was a short film of vacation destinations and the amenities they had to offer. One of the earliest of these travelogues was "The Magic of Walt Disney World."

Tangled Recap: Max's Enemy


(Originally posted on October 16, 2017.)


First, they make an episode about the chameleon. Now, they've made an episode about the horse. What's next? An episode about Shorty? (Why do I get the feeling that's actually going to be a future episode?)

So, yeah, stop me if you've heard this one before: a character who's loved by everybody becomes jealous when he's upstaged by a new character. Yeah, this episode has been done before. So there's not really much to comment about it.

Well, I will say this: aside from the fact that it recycles the cliché jealousy plot, it also recycles the plot twist with the new character secretly being evil. Remember kids: if someone ends up being better than you, it's really because they're secretly a villain--because you and only you are entitled to the adoration of others!

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: The Wrath of Ruthless Ruth


(Originally posted on October 14, 2017.)


This episode makes for an excellent Halloween episode, or at least it would have had it premiered closer to Halloween rather than four weeks earlier!

Rapunzel has an endearing desire to ensure that her subjects are able to follow her dream, and it seems like nothing will stop her from accomplishing just that, not even death itself. (At least, not her own death!)

Aside from serving up overall spooky fun--and just in time for Halloween!--this episode offers a very important lesson about following you dream when you have the chance and not letting anyone or anything stop you from doing just that.

Like Ruth, many of us never move forward in following our dreams, and far too many people have passed away living an unfulfilled life without achieving that dream. At least in this episode, Ruth had a second chance, but for the rest of us, we only have one life to live, so it's best to live it to our fullest. As Rapunzel said, only we're in charge of our own destiny, and it's up to us to follow through with it.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: Big Brothers of Corona


(Originally posted on October 3, 2017.)


The central theme of this series has been self-discovery and the struggle to achieve it by overcoming the conflict between personal identity and societal expectations. Throughout this series, not only have we seen this theme manifested through the main characters trying to overcome such expectations in order to discover their true identities, but we’ve also seen them helping other people overcome similar challenges in order to have them become the people they were truly meant to be.

We’ve seen this with Rapunzel as she’s used her power as a royal monarch to help people within her kingdom achieve their own dreams, as with the case with Attila and the other pub thugs at the Snuggly Duckling. We’ve also seen it with Flynn, as he uses his previous experience as a thief to help others, whether it’s helping the royal guards learn how to better catch criminals, or trying (albeit failing) to reform his former partner-in-crime, Lance Strongbow.

With this episode, we have Flynn once again trying to use his previous experience to help reform two juvenile delinquents. As a former delinquent himself, he knows the hardship that comes from a life of crime, and so he desperately wants to convey his experience to them in order to set them on the straight and narrow. However, try as he might, he cannot seem to convince them.

Rapunzel faces a similar dilemma, wherein, having partially helped get her friend Cassandra injured, she tries her best to provide whatever help her lady-in-waiting can receive to recover, even if Cassandra doesn't want or require that help.

Both main characters quickly learn that no amount of effort on their part can change or help a person unless that person is willing to change or to be helped. The most that they can do themselves is wait until the person they want to help accepts their help.

We all want to help people change, but more often than not, we place that burden on ourselves alone. Ultimately, that responsibility is on them and not us. We can’t change people, try as we might. Only they can change themselves. Only when they decide to do so can we help them. That’s a very important lesson, and one that is often overlooked.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: Pascal's Story


(Originally posted on October 13, 2017.)


I mentioned early on that, when I first learned that Tangled was receiving its own animated series, that I was skeptical whether or not the movie lent itself to such a series. The past few episodes have since proven me wrong. And this episode proved that, not only was the series capable of making an entire episode about Rapunzel's pet chameleon, Pascal, but that it would have me care about him.

This episode delves into Pascal's origins, and they are as Disney-esque as they could be: his mother was killed protecting him from an evil snake. The snake pursued him. Rapunzel managed to swat it away and save Pascal. She be-friended the chameleon. The two grew up together. And she promised him that they would be best friends forever.

To be certain, the opening is very reminiscent of The Fox and the Hound, and the rest of the episode is your typical plot about someone feeling unappreciated, only to later learn that he is very much appreciated. However, the entire episode is filled with your typical Disney pathos that allows you to feel for the little guy, making you almost disbelieve that you could care for a lizard--or rather, a frog as he's mistakenly called.

Tangled Recap: One Angry Princess


(Originally posted on October 12, 2017.)


As a princess, one of Rapunzel's main motivations is helping her people follow their dreams the same way that others had helped her follow her own dream. Especially noble is how she often helps those that are often overlooked or even shunned by society, as she believes that every one, no matter who they are, have a dream that they deserve to follow and make come true.

Her motivation couldn't be more apparent than with this episode, where she tries to help one of the pub thugs from the Snuggly Duckling follow his dream of becoming a baker. However, complicating matters is his reputation as a "low-life", which not only prevents his business from taking off, but also gets him accused of a crime that he didn't commit.

Whether it's by helping him pursue his dream or clear his name, it's clear that Rapunzel demonstrates the love she has for her citizens, no matter who they are, as she believes that everyone deserves a fair chance.

Tangled Recap: Under Raps


(Originally posted on October 11, 2017.)


Funny how even in the fantasy worlds of Disney, holidays like Valentines Day are seen by many not engrossed in celebration of the holiday as "single awareness day!"

To be sure, this episode has plenty of romance, not only as the plot's crux with Cass finally revealing that she has a certain special someone, but also within the world's lore, what with the kingdom of Corona being founded by two warring monarchs coming together through their secret confession of love for one another. So romantics will most likely love this episode, whereas everyone else could consider it another form of "singles awareness."

Joking aside, the main focus of the episode, aside from the romantic relationships, is with the platonic relationship between Rapunzel and Cassandra. Specifically, the focus is on the dichotomy between the two's conflicting personalities, with Rapunzel being an extrovert (despite having been trapped in a tower for years) who wants to learn more about Cass's problems, while Cass is an introvert who wants to keep her own problems to herself.

Anyone who has ever been in a friendship can empathize with either of these characters, either as the caring friend who wants to know what's going on in the best friend's life, or as the friend who wants to keep something personal about themself to themself without having to burden their other friends. In either case, such a conflict is ultimately resolved in the episode in the most clever, if not relatable, way possible.

Also, this episode involves a secret society of rebels and a fight in a hot air balloon. Seriously, there ought to be more actions scenes involving balloons. They are awesome!

Tangled Recap: Great Exportations


(Originally posted on October 10, 2017.)


This episode stars Varian, one of the better side characters in the series. This already makes this episode "20 percent cooler" in my eyes. Also getting to see a medieval version of a science fair is pretty hilarious, especially with what this fantasy world considers to be science (i.e.: alchemy!)

Other than that, there's not really much for me to say about this episode. It's cool seeing Varian's inventions in action (and even seeing Rapunzel's attempt at creating her own "inventions"), and the climax to the whole scenario is as awesome as one would expect it to be. Otherwise, it's your typical "don't put personal obligations over that of your friends" morality play that ends with more fore-shadowing of the overall season-long story arc.

Tangled Recap: In Like Flynn


While Rapunzel's story arc in this series involves her trying to find her place in the world in spite of her future as a princess, Flynn's story arc similarly involves him trying to find his place in spite of his past as a criminal, whether it's him trying to get a job, coming to terms with a former partner in crime, or in this case, trying to impress his father-in-law.

No doubt King Frederic is eternally grateful to Flynn for having rescued his long lost daughter, but there can also be no doubt that he has mixed feelings about having his future son-in-law being a former criminal, especially one who once stole a royal heirloom. How fortuitous is it, then, that Flynn gets to finally prove himself to the king by utilizing the skills from his past, and to help the king win a prank war, of all things!

The only thing more entertaining with seeing Flynn struggle to complete his frat boy-esque mission with otherwise inept father-in-law in tow is seeing Rapunzel try to "prank" her friends by doing nice things for them. Seriously, though, how much nicer would the world be if more people decided to "Rapunzel" rather than "punk" people in real life?

Tangled Recap: The Return of Strongbow


(Originally posted on October 8, 2017.)


Flynn's character arc for this series involves him trying to overcome his criminal past to start a new life for him and Rapunzel. We previously saw this character struggle with him trying to find employment in spite of his past (something that far too many people in this country struggle with due to our insanely high incarceration and recidivism rates), and in this episode, we see that struggle once again with him being confronted with remnants of his former life.

This episode saw him reunite with an old partner in crime, Lance Strongbow, who, un-transparently to everyone but Rapunzel, has come back with the intention of having Flynn help him with a burglary. Not only does this force him to confront his criminal part through an old "friend", but also by having him come to terms with the consequences of a past crime, which ironically involved him (unknowingly) stealing the ring of his girlfriend's mother.

Although we know from the start that Flynn, having already accepted his new place as the prince consort, will inevitably do the right thing and make amends with his past, both by severing ties with an old partner and seeking forgiveness from a past victim, we still feel for his struggle in trying to do the right thing, which proves to be very hard for him, and could very well cost him everything he's since gained. (Also, Rapunzel has the best milk mustache!)

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: Cassandra v. Eugene


(Originally posted on October 7, 2017.)


Considering how the needless conflict between Flynn and Cassandra is the aspect of the show that I like least, I thoroughly enjoyed the schadenfreude of seeing these two forced inside a jail cell to settle their differences.

We've all been in a situation where we had two friends that we really liked but whom don't like each other, and we've had to struggle in finding a way to have those two un-friendly friends find something about each other that they could relate with. So watching Rapunzel result to such a drastic measure, while overtly cliche, is something we could find entertaining.

Also, this episode saw the return of the Stabbington Brothers. And honestly, there's not much else for me to say about this episode other than it was a decent watch. It was a decent watch.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: Challenge of the Brave


(Originally posted on October 6, 2017)


What can I say? I'm a sucker for tournament episodes and story arcs, especially in anime: Naruto, DBZ, YuYu Hakusho. Sure, they tend to be big time-wasters as filler, but there's nothing more exciting than seeing one character go up against another main character in combat. And this episode manages to offer such excitement.

While Cassandra isn't my favorite character, there are aspects that I do somewhat admire. Her main aspect is the struggle that she faces throughout the series with her dream of becoming a royal guard and the reality of having to serve as a lady-in-waiting due to the societal gender roles thrust upon her. Compounding matters is how she plays second fiddle to the princess in the land.

Because of this, we she the motivation that drives her to competing within the Challenge of the Brave. Not only would this show off her fighting skills and prowess that would prove her to be a more than capable royal guard, but it would help her gain attention that she envies from Rapunzel.

Thus things become especially complicated when Rapunzel enters the fray. What comes across as mere fun and games to the princess is something that matter much more to Cassandra. As such, being forced to compete alongside not only her best friend, but along someone who doesn't take matters as seriously as she does, Cassandra is not surprisingly un-amused by the whole ordeal, and what started out as a friendly competition turns into bitter rivalry among friends.

In other words, this episode is a lot like the "Fry Cook Games" from Spongebob if it wasn't tongue-in-cheek. Also, seeing Flynn suffer as an insufferable sports fan is great schadenfreude to witness.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: Fitzherbert P.I.


(Originally posted on October 5, 2017.)


One of the show's central themes is the conflict between personal identity and societal expectations. Rapunzel wants to find out who she is as a person after spending years trapped in her tower, yet she's forced by her father and the kingdom to live up to her duty as a princess. Cassandra wants to be a royal guard, and yet remains keyholed into the societal gender roles of being a lady-in-waiting.

And in this episode, Flynn wants to turn over a new leaf for himself, yet has to contend with his past life as a thief, both in the fact that very few people trust him, and that his life without a formal education has left him with very few employable jobs skills.

To his credit, after a hilarious montage of him trying and failing many jobs, he finally decides to land a job as part of the castle's royal guard, which, again, due to his past life as a notorious thief, makes his attempt to pursue the job receiving a lot of skepticism and even push back, especially from the head guard himself.

Even after sucessfully passing his requirements for the job, he still manages to fall short by failing that one job he had, but manages to redeem himself when his past experience as a theif helps track down another thief.

This is an excellent episode that reflects the show's overall theme of overcoming the expectations of society in order to pursue you own personal goals, and it certainly makes it one of my favorites.

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: Rapunzel's Enemy


(Originally posted on October 4, 2017.)


Do you know what I dislike more than an episode whose plot has been done to death? An episode where the characters act stupid and out of character in order for the episode to work. And "lucky" me, this episode pulled a double whammy.

Stop me if you heard this before. You have a character who's liked by everyone discovering that there's one person who doesn't like them? If that doesn't sound like episodes like Recess' "Nobody Doesn't Likes TJ", then congratulations, this episode will be new to you. For the rest of us, unfortunately, it will be something we've already seen too many times before, and by other Disney shows no less.

Don't get me wrong, a lesson like "you can't please all of the people all of the time" is a good lesson that needs to be taught, especially to young children, but like every other morality play, it's something that has been done to death and rarely is ever rejuvinated with a fresh take.

To it's credit, this episode had a chance to offer such a fresh take. Later in the episode, Monty explains that the reason why he doesn't like Rapunzel is because she's bringing a lot of radical changes to the kingdom and its traditions that makes him, as an older person, feel uncomfortable and outdated. Now that right there is an interesting take, and could have been better explored as a metaphor about the generation gap between Baby Boomers and Millenials. How interesting would the episode have been had it explored that angle? Instead, we get the tired cliche "not everyone has to like you" moral. How ironic that an episode that harps about people who don't like change refuses to change?

And need I say anything about the "B plot" with Flynn and Cassandra taking care of the gopher? Funny how Cassandra didn't trust Flynn enough to keep Rapunzel's secret in the last episode, yet she trusts him enough to look after the most prized gopher in the kingdom? Meh, this episode is a dud!

Follow a scene-by-scene recap of the best scenes by clicking READ MORE:

Tangled Recap: What The Hair?


(Originally posted on October 2, 2017)


Remember how in the last recap I said Cassandra wasn't my favorite character? This episode explains why. She doesn't really do much other than create needless conflict between Rapunzel and Flynn.

In any other circumstance, Rapunzel wouldn't need to keep a secret about her hair from Flynn, the very person who helped rescue her from her tower and reunite her with her long lost parents. But because we need to fill out an entire episode, she needs to be forced by Cassandra not to tell him for no other reason than she doesn't like or trust him.

That pretty much sums up the problem with this episode. It doesn't really offer anything unique, especially with a story whose moral is not to keep big secrets from people. It's something most of us have already seen before and don't really need to see again, though to its credit, it will at least entertain the children to whom this lesson is supposed to teach.

Well, I take it back. This episode did include one good thing: Varian. What can I say? I'm interested in geeky, introverted, and socially awkward characters like him. He's like a medieval version of Hiro from Big Hero 6, which in turn would be like Hiccup from HTTYD. Otherwise, episode with contrived and overused story line is contrived and overused.

Check out the scene-by-scene recap after the break below:

Tangled Recap: Before Ever After


(Originally posted on October 1, 2017)


The best way to describe Tangled: Before Ever After is to compare it to a McDonalds Happy Meal. Nobody visits McDonalds expecting a substantial meal, but it’s a good place to visit on your lunch break for a fast meal that’s tasty, satisfactory, and capable of holding your over until dinner—plus you also get a pretty cool toy to play with.

Likewise, as a movie, even a made-for-television movie, Tangled: Before After isn’t that substantial, especially when compared to the big Disney animated hit it’s based on; but as a pilot, it does its job well of setting up the animated series and providing an experience that’s tasty, satisfactory, and capable of holding viewers over until the series’ premiere—plus you know that it’s going to help promote a lot of cool toys for kids to play with.

I must confess: when I first learned the Disney Channel was making an animated series about Tangled, I was skeptical. I never truly felt the movie leant itself to a television series. Like many other Disney movies, when Tangled ended with “and they all lived happily ever after”, I believed it. I felt the story was complete with no need of continuation—though the animated short “Tangled Ever After” served as a nice complimentary epilogue.

Sure, there were many other Disney movies that leant themselves to sequels or an animated series (such as Big Hero 6, which is set to premiere its own series later this year), but Tangled didn’t seem like one of them. This special managed to melt away my skepticism, as it did a good job of justifying turning this movie into a series.

Tangled: Before Ever After, true to its name, is set in a time after the movie and before the animated short. Rapunzel, upon reuniting with her long lost parents, the King and Queen of Corona, is set to take her rightful place as princess through her upcoming coronation, and as such, must prepare herself to take on the duties and responsibilities as the future queen.

Having all of these expectations thrust upon her makes poor Rapunzel feel overburdened, who, despite having escaped the confines of her tower, feels even less free now that she has to take on such a big and equally confining role, made all the more difficult as being trapped in a tower for most of her life has prevented her from obtaining the appropriate social skills.

This special, along with the rest of the series, does an excellent job of portraying the struggles that Rapunzel faces balancing both her role as a monarch and her personal journey of self-discovery. She wants to be able to find herself and learn who she really is as a person, and yet she feels that such a role remains pre-determined for her as a future ruling monarch.

This struggle is especially exemplified between the relationship she has with her parents—a relationship we rarely get to see with many Disney princesses, as many have at least one or more of their parents deceased. Her father, having already lost her once, doesn’t want to risk losing her again, and as such, remains overprotective of her and adamant about her taking her rightful place on the throne. Her mother, on the other hand, knows from personal experience the inner struggles she faces, and as such encourages her to follow her dreams and find herself as an individual.

Aside from this, the rest of the special does an adequate enough job of serving as a pilot to the series, setting up the main theme of the show (self-discovery), introducing new characters (Cassandra) as well as providing an explanation of why Rapunzel has her long hair again (through deus ex magic rock). Other than that, the special as a stand-along movie is rather weak in conflict, with what constitutes as a “villain” only showing up later in the third act. Other than that, the special does a good job preparing viewers for what’s to come in the animated series.

Read past the break bellow for a scene-by-scene recap:

Friday, October 20, 2017

Introducing The Disney Dudebro


Greetings! Allow me to introduce myself. I am the Disney Dudebro. As my name implies, I'm just a dude who loves Disney, and this is my blog where I discuss my love for Disney. That includes everything Disney-related, including Pixar, Star Wars, and Marvel.

What can you expect on this blog? Expect reviews of the latest movies, episode recaps of the hottest television shows, and editorials and other posts about everything and anything Disney. Because at the end of the day, nobody's too cool for Disney. Not even a "dudebro" like myself!

Here are a few regular features you can expect from this blog:

Dateline Disney: A compilation of the week's big news stories about everything and anything Disney. (Posted every Sunday)

Throwback Thursday: A nostalgic lookback at the Disney of the past, including things long forgotten by history. (Posted every Thursday)

Fan Art Friday: A showcase of the best fan art from across the internet. Every week has its own theme. (Posted every Friday)

Episode Recaps: A short review, followed by a lengthy scene-by-scene recap, of the latest episodes of popular animated Disney shows, including Tangled: The Series, Ducktales, Star Vs. The Forces Of Evil, and the upcoming Big Hero 6: The Series. (Posted at least two days after the episode's airing, if not within the same week.)

And also an editorial, article, or list every Monday.

Be sure to catch my latest content by following my blog, as well as my accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr.

See you real soon! And remember: nobody's to cool for Disney!